My Mindfulness Journey

I’m not ashamed to say it – I can probably make for the poster-child of people who perhaps peaked way too early in life, because for a very long period of my adult life, if I took an honest look at myself I would have had no choice but to admit that the best days of my life had already been behind me. Fortunately though that honesty came in good time and so I decided to make the positive changes that would effectively lead to the “second-peak,” which I truly believe is much more commendable than the first peak because the benefits to be enjoyed thereof come with a whole lot more freedom than that which I had as a kid, growing up.

So let’s just go through what is effectively a journey to mindfulness, of which the benefits I’m getting high off of daily, just thinking about how far I’ve come.

Peaking too early

The phenomenon of peaking to early is not necessarily a bad thing to have to endure as part of one’s life, but only if at some point you realise what just happened and you are able to map out a way forward to move on from it and set into motion the actionable terrace to effectively facilitate a second peak. Naturally the second peak will have you aiming higher, simply because of what is required to facilitate that second peak.

Since the first peak would have naturally been part of the formative years of your life, when actually hitting your peak pretty much just entailed doing what you were told to do by some authoritative figures in your life, a certain level of mindfulness is required for the second peak which is to come once you’re an adult.

Throughout my primary schooling and in the earlier parts of my high school years, I was what you’d call an overachiever. This didn’t permeate every last area in which a school kid could be an overachiever, such as sports in particular. I was an academic and I also killed it with the eisteddfod, which thinking back makes me laugh now because I guess that’s what set the path for me to eventually become the entrepreneur I am today and a life-development consultant, correspondent, coach and authority.

Things started going downhill after grade 10 though, because I guess I could say that’s when I reached the very top and so the motivation to maintain any level of consistent hard work was nullified…

The epiphanies

As you might very well know, once one makes the transition from high school into the uni-years, you cannot get by on talent alone. This is why the B and C students are the ones who go on to get through college in record time, because that’s what’s required – you just need to be diligent in putting in the hours of work to merely get through the finish line. You cannot, like what overachievers usually do, drift in and out of giving your best and letting things simmer a bit while you explore other areas of life. Things get out of hand quickly and it can be hard to catch up to the suggested pit-stop at which you would have been expected to be by a certain time.

So throughout college I would go on to realise that I needed to pull up my socks and start working to finish, which naturally made for some uninspiring times of the misery of knowing that after I eventually finish I will probably be in for more misery in an eight-to-four, corporate setting.

I didn’t act on it immediately, but it was then that my first epiphany hit me and what I had to do started forming inside my mind.

Hitting the second peak

The second epiphany wasn’t a completely new and independent one from the first, rather coming as a reinforcement of the first on. I realised that hitting my second peak, which would be higher than the first one could have ever been, required the zoning-in on the keys to mindfulness.

It all began with taking responsibility for merely surviving the day and then once all the basics were taken care of, attention could be shifted to trying to gain an advantage in any small way that I could to better my life in any which way possible. It all adds up eventually and you find yourself scaling some dizzying heights.